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The unpublished stories behind the
world’s most compelling science,
as told by the researchers themselves.

Latest Episode

Forking Paths of Kids' Screen Time with Amy Orben

Are adolescents' technology use really related to depression, suicide and ADHD, or might it be no worse for kids than eating potatoes? In episode...

Listen to the episode Forking Paths of Kids’ Screen Time – Amy Orben

RECENT EPISODES

Trusting our Machines with Neera Jain

Might enabling computational aids to "self-correct" when they’re out of sync with people be a path toward their exhibition of recognizably intelligent behavior? In episode 46, Neera...

Listen to the episode Trusting Our Machines — Neera Jain

The Wonder of STEVE with Liz MacDonald

In episode 45, Liz MacDonald from the NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, discusses in her research into STEVE, a previously unrecorded atmospheric phenomenon discovered by citizen scientists...

Listen to the episode The Wonder of STEVE – Liz MacDonald

Photo of Laura Mauldin with baby outdoors.

Becoming Deaf with Laura Mauldin

To what extent could "coming out" be a useful analogy for the process of coming to identify as Deaf? In episode 44, Laura Mauldin from the University of Connecticut discusses her research...

Listen to the episode Becoming Deaf – Laura Mauldin

p-Hacking Business with Ron Berman

Whether intentionally or unintentionally, might the manipulation of statistics in marketing research be costing companies millions? In episode 43, Ron Berman from the University of Pennsylvania's...

Listen to the episode p-Hacking Business – Ron Berman

Voyeuristic Birds with Masayo Soma

Could birds' courting behaviors change when they're being watched? In episode 42, Masayo Soma from Hokkaido University discusses her research into monogamous songbirds which intensify...

Listen to the episode Voyeuristic Birds – Masayo Soma

A Sniff Test of Stress with Jonathan Williams

Might the chemicals we exhale while watching movies tell us about the emotional stress that we're experiencing? In episode 41, Jonathan Williams from the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry...

Listen to the episode A Sniff Test of Stress – Jonathan Williams

Cognitive Biases on the Supreme Court with Jonathan Feingold and Evelyn Carter

Can cognitive biases and heuristics regarding race influence U.S. Supreme Court decisions? In episode 40, Jonathan Feingold and Evelyn Carter from the University of California, Los Angeles...

Listen to the episode Cognitive Biases on the Supreme Court – Jonathan Feingold & Evelyn Carter

Archaeology of the Recent Past (Part 2 of 2) with P.J. Capelotti

While we often associate archaeology with the study of cultures whose eras have long-since come and gone, artifacts from the recent past can tell us about culture as well. Part one of...

Listen to the episode Archaeology of the Recent Past (Part 2 of 2) – P.J. Capelotti

Archaeology of the Recent Past (Part 1 of 2) with P.J. Capelotti

Ordinary objects from the recent past often hold secrets about our cultural history. In episode 38, P.J. Capelotti from Penn State University Abington talks with us about the history,...

Listen to the episode Archaeology of the Recent Past (Part 1 of 2) – P.J. Capelotti

HOSTS



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Doug Leigh

Doug Leigh, Ph.D., is a Professor with Pepperdine University in Los Angeles. His research interests are psychometrics, machine learning, and science communication.
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Ryan Watkins

Ryan Watkins, Ph.D., is a Professor at George Washington University in Washington DC. His research interests are needs, needs assessments, instructional design, and human-technology collaboration.