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4 Sep 2018

Nothing to a Bee – Adrian Dyer

While various vertebrates have been taught to learn humans’ concept of “zero,” might too honey bees, even though their brains have thousands of times fewer neurons? In episode 31 Adrian Dyer from RMIT and Monash University in Australia talks with us about his work first teaching bees to count and then extrapolate what they’ve learned to infer zero.

Continue reading..Nothing to a Bee – Adrian Dyer
7 Aug 2018

Differing Interpretations of Difficulty – Neil Lewis, Jr.

“No matter whether you think you can or can’t,” the saying goes, “you’re right.” Neil Lewis, Jr. from Cornell University talks with us about about his research into what differentiates students who experience difficulty in college as signaling its importance from those that make it mean that completing college is impossible. His article “No pain no gain? Social demographic correlates and identity consequences of interpreting experienced difficulty as importance” was published with Cristina Aelenei and Daphna Oyserman in the January 2017 issue of Contemporary Educational Psychology.

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24 Jul 2018

Debunking Pterosaurs Flight – Armita Manafzadeh

Righting a 200 year old mistake: Armita Manafzadeh from Brown University talks with us about how her simulations of pterosaurs’ range-of-motion demonstrate that the ancient reptiles almost certainly couldn’t have flown like most paleontologists have long thought. Her article, “ROM mapping of ligamentous constraints on avian hip mobility: implications for extinct ornithodirans” was published on May 23, 2018 with Kevin Padian in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B – Biological Science.

Continue reading..Debunking Pterosaurs Flight – Armita Manafzadeh
10 Jul 2018

Prehistoric Origins of Birds – Bhart-Anjan Bhullar

Bhart-Anjan Bhullar from Yale University talks with us about how the discovery of a 95 million year old Ichthyornis fossil in 2014 revealed some unexpected insights into the minds, and mouths, of toady’s birds. Subscribe: iTunes | Google Podcast | Google Play | RSS

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5 Jul 2018

Retaining LGBQ Undergraduates in STEM – Bryce Hughes

In celebration of LGBTSTEMDay, talk with Bryce Hughes of Montana State University about his research into the factors that influence the retention of LGBT students in STEM programs. For more information, including materials discussed during this episode, visit ParsingScience.org. Subscribe: iTunes | Google Podcast | Google Play | RSS

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29 May 2018

Structural Racism & Police Shootings – Anita Knopov

Anita Knopov from Boston University talks with us about her research into how state-level implicit bias relates to the disparity in police shootings of unarmed Black Americans. For more information, including materials discussed during this episode, visit ParsingScience.org. Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS.

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15 May 2018

Uncovering Uncertain Identities – David Kernot

We set out talk with David Kernot from Australia’s Defence Science and Technology Group about William Shakespeare’s true identity, but soon discovered his work has implications on national security and suicide prevention, as well as diagnosing Alzheimer’s years before it can be otherwise identified. In episode 23 of Parsing Science, David talks with us about the many applications of his research into training algorithms to uncover peoples’ personalities from their written words.

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1 May 2018

Linguistic Artifacts in Creole – Nicole Creanza

Nicole Creanza, from Vanderbilt University, talks with us about her recent research into the colonial migrations of those who contributed to the historical evolution of the creole language, Sranan. For more information, including materials discussed during this episode, visit ParsingScience.org. Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS.

Continue reading..Linguistic Artifacts in Creole – Nicole Creanza
2 Apr 2018

How Misinformation Spreads Online – Soroush Vosoughi

By now, we’re all familiar with the idea that social media can – and has – been used to spread untruths. But why does this work? Soroush Vosoughi from MIT’s Laboratory for Social Machines and Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center talks with us in episode 20 about his research into how false news disseminates differently than true news on Twitter.

Continue reading..How Misinformation Spreads Online – Soroush Vosoughi